Guest Artists

Clifton Swanson

Clifton SwansonMusic Department Professor Emeritus Clifton Swanson began teaching at Cal Poly in 1967 with an emphasis on music appreciation and music history. He soon assumed responsibility for Cal Poly’s orchestra and became active as a conductor with the Cal Poly Chamber Orchestra and San Luis Obispo Symphony. In 1971 he co-founded the San Luis Obispo Mozart Festival (now Festival Mozaic). He was elected Music Department chair in 1983, and served in that role almost continuously until his retirement in 2004. 

Swanson has received numerous awards, including the university’s President’s Award for Contributions to the Arts of San Luis Obispo County, the Outstanding Liberal Arts Professor by College of Engineering Students (1994), and the College of Liberal Arts’ Outstanding Service Award for 2002-03. He served as director of Cal Poly’s London Study Program many times between 1986 and 2006.

Before coming to Cal Poly, Swanson graduated from Pomona College and earned his master’s degree in music literature from the University of Texas with additional study at UCLA. His attendance at the Aston Magna Academy focusing on the works of J.S. Bach in 1985 led to the “Mozart Akademie” as part of the San Luis Obispo Mozart Festival which inspired the Cal Poly's Bach Week Akademie.

One of Swanson’s great pleasures has been his association with the inspiration, conception, design and support of the Performing Arts Center's Christopher Cohan Center on the Cal Poly campus. He participated in the original design committee, served for nine years on the board of directors of the Foundation for the Performing Arts Center, and served a term as president of the board.

Swanson is an active double bass player and never turns down an opportunity to play the music of Johann Sebastian Bach.


Jeffrey Fields

Jeffrey FieldsJeffrey Fields is from the San Francisco Bay Area and sings regularly as a soloist and ensemble member with Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, American Bach Soloists, Bach Collegium San Diego, and Carmel Bach Festival. He made his Carnegie Hall solo debut in Handel’s “Messiah” in 2007 under Andrew Megill and returned to the hall in 2012 with Aoede Consort.

Recent solo engagements include Handel's “Teseo” with Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra for the Mostly Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center and at Tanglewood, Rossini's “Petite Messe Solenelle” and Haydn masses at Stanford University, Bach's "St. John Passion" in Berkeley, Purcell's “Dioclesian” with Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Handel's “Dixit Dominus” with Bach Collegium San Diego, Haydn's “The Seasons” at UC Berkeley, Dvořák's “Stabat Mater” in San Francisco, Handel's “Alexander's Feast” under Jeffrey Thomas, Handel’s “Samson” with Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Orff's “Carmina Burana,” the title role in Mendelssohn's “Elijah” for Marin Oratorio, and Handel's “Acis and Galatea” with the California Bach Society.

Fields studied with Albert Gammon, taught voice and singers' diction at the University of Iowa, and was an artist fellow for three seasons at the Bach Aria Festival in Stony Brook, New York. He was a three-time winner of the National Association of Teachers of Singing - Central Region auditions.


Mensa Sonora California

The members of Mensa Sonora California have played together in many different combinations and formations over the years in the Bay Area, at Stanford University, at the San Luis Obispo Mozart Festival, the Aston Magna Festival and elsewhere. Its members regularly appear in such groups as Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, Jubilate Baroque Orchestra and Archetti Baroque Strings, a Bay Area ensemble dedicated to the concerto repertoire of the 18th century. Their passion is primarily for the music of the 17th and early 18th centuries, the “Wild West” of western music.

On Friday evening of Bach Week, the group will present “Bach and His Students,” a chamber concert in Mission San Luis Obispo.

 

Charles Sherman

Charles Sherman, harpsichord, is recognized as one of the leading harpsichord soloists and continuo players in the country, and has been called a “fluent virtuoso” by the Los Angeles Times. Since 1997, he has been a member of Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra and Musica Pacifica. Previously, as a member of the Aulos Ensemble in New York, he toured regularly throughout North America and overseas and recorded extensively. He has also performed with such acclaimed ensembles as the Philadelphia Orchestra, American Baroque, Musica Angelica, Handel and Haydn Society, Emmanuel Music, St. Luke’s Chamber Ensemble and Concert Royal, and at well-known music festivals, including in Marlboro and Saratoga, the New England Bach Festival, early music festivals in Boston and Berkeley, and Aston Magna. Sherman holds degrees in history and musicology from the University of Chicago and in harpsichord performance from the Juilliard School, where he studied with Albert Fuller. His recordings appear on the Dorian, Musical Heritage Society, Koch International, Reference Recordings and BMG labels.

Charles Sherman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Wilson

David Wilson, violin, plays regularly with Ensemble Vermillian and Heartland Baroque, and he is a founding member of Archetti, the Galax Quartet and other ensembles. He has taught baroque violin at Indiana University, where he earned a Doctor of Music degree in early music, and he holds degrees in violin from Bowling Green State University in Ohio and The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. He teaches violin and chamber music and directs the orchestra at the San Francisco Early Music Society’s annual Baroque Workshop. In recent years he has performed and recorded classical music of India and the Ottoman Empire with Lux Musica (East Meets West Music and Golden Horn Records), contemporary music with the Galax Quartet (Innova Recordings), and 18th-century concerti with Archetti (Centaur Records). He is the author of "Georg Muffat on Performance Practice," published by Indiana University Press, and of an article on Muffat in the forthcoming Cambridge Encyclopedia of Historical Performance in Music.

David Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anthony Martin

Anthony Martin, violin, teaches at Stanford University where he directs the Stanford Baroque Soloists. He plays and has made recordings with numerous early music groups, including Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, the New Esterházy Quartet, and Orchestra of the Eighteenth Century in Amsterdam.

Anthony Martin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Dornenburg

John Dornenburg, viola da gamba, is a San Francisco Bay Area performer, teacher and recording artist on the viola da gamba and violone. He has made over 30 CDs of both solo and chamber music, primarily for the Centaur and Meridian labels. He is co-director of the Archetti Baroque String Ensemble, founder of the Baroque ensemble Music’s Re-creation, and director of the Sex Chordae Consort of Viols. He can also be heard with many other leading ensembles in the U.S., and has performed widely in Australia, Europe, the Middle East and New Zealand. Dornenburg is lecturer in viola da gamba at Stanford University, teaches violone at UC Berkeley, and is faculty emeritus in music history at California State University, Sacramento. He had the great privilege to study Baroque music for many years with several of the pioneering legends in period instrument performance, and would like to acknowledge his teachers Nikolaus Harnoncourt and Wieland Kuijken in particular.

John Dornenburg